Will I have an attorney at my Social Security disability appeal hearing?

This may seem like a simple question with a very obvious answer, but it is one of the first questions you should always ask a disability attorney during your initial consultation.

The reason you should ask the question is because many other law firms will have a paralegal or a non-attorney represent you at your hearing rather than a licensed attorney with experience in Social Security disability law.

Why Isn’t This Good Enough?

Paralegals who work for disability law firms are very knowledgeable about Social Security disability law and they provide valuable work on Social Security disability claims. However, we strongly feel that an attorney consistently provides superior representation for our clients at disability appeal hearings.

Don’t Be Caught by Surprise

Many Social Security disability claimants have described situations where they worked with a law firm that did not tell them an actual attorney would not represent them until they arrived at the Office of Adjudication and Review (ODAR) on the day of their hearing. Your claim is too important for this type of surprise.

If you have an upcoming Social Security disability appeal hearing, you deserve to know exactly what will happen and who will be with you at the hearing. Our attorneys will prepare you for the hearing and be with you every step of the way so that your rights can be protected and you can get the benefits you deserve.

It doesn’t cost you any more to have a board-certified, experienced disability lawyer represent you than it does to have a paralegal or a non-attorney advocate represent you. Accordingly, we encourage you to contact our firm if you are appealing a Social Security disability claim. Please reach out to us via this website or by phone at your convenience to learn more about how we can help you through the Social Security disability appeals process.

Carl M. Weisbrod
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Managing Partner of Morgan & Weisbrod, Board Certified in Social Security Disability Law