I’m blind. Am I eligible for Social Security disability if I still work?

You may be eligible for Social Security disability if you are blind and you have a job; however, special rules apply that are relevant to your eligibility. These rules are known as work incentives.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) has work incentives in place for people with all kinds of disabilities, including low vision or blindness. Work incentives allow a Social Security disability applicant to earn a certain amount of money monthly and still receive Social Security disability benefits. The SSA defines work incentives in two ways: (1) for people with disabilities who are not blind; and (2) for people who are blind. The amount that a person can earn and still remain eligible for Social Security disability changes annually. In 2015, a person who is blind may earn up to $1,820 a month and remain eligible for Social Security disability and a person who is disabled, but not blind, may only earn up to $1,090 a month and remain eligible for Social Security disability.

Special Rules Apply If You Are 55 or Older

If you are blind, you are 55 or older, and you are doing a job that requires a lower skill or ability than the job you did before you reached age 55, your Social Security disability benefits will not end even if you earn more than $1,820 a month. Instead, your disability benefits will be suspended for any month that you exceed $1,820 in income and will be available to you again for any month that you do not earn at least $1,820.

Both your work and your Social Security disability benefits may be important to you. Accordingly, it is important to understand the law and to protect your rights. For more information about that, please call us today at 877-898-1581.

Carl M. Weisbrod
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Managing Partner of Morgan & Weisbrod, Board Certified in Social Security Disability Law